KW Homestead

Pasture Raised Poultry from Our Family to Yours

Tag: recipes (page 1 of 3)

How Do You Cook Duck Eggs?

Oftentimes we are asked how duck eggs should be cooked. One of the great things about duck eggs, is that they can be cooked in all the same ways as classic chicken eggs. If you’re interested in seeing a nutritional profile comparing duck eggs and chicken eggs, visit this page on our website. Here are a few more tips:

Fried Duck Eggs

We usually fry our duck eggs over-easy, but duck eggs shine as fried eggs no matter how you cook them. The only difference in cooking duck eggs is that cooking them on medium heat is more effective than high heat (as folks often do with chicken eggs). Since duck eggs have a higher fat content, cooking them on high increases the risk that you might burn the eggs before they’re fully cooked. Another great thing about duck eggs is that the yolks hold together very well when flipping them, so you rarely get a busted yolk. Perfect!

Fried Duck Eggs

Fried Duck Eggs

Scrambled Duck Eggs/Duck Egg Omelettes

Jason particularly enjoys our scrambled duck eggs and omelets. Duck eggs are great for cooking in this way, especially since they hold up better than chicken eggs and retain more texture and flavor when cooked omelette-style. Duck eggs are significantly more flavorful than chicken eggs, and creamier in texture. They’re extra delicious when you add veggies and other yummies to your omelette.

A Lambsquarter, Purple Potato, and Duck Eggs Omelette!

A Lambsquarter, Purple Potato, and Duck Eggs Omelette!

Boiled/Deviled Duck Eggs

Boiled duck eggs are one of Emma’s favorite ways to eat our eggs. We boil them a bit longer than chicken eggs, but we know everyone has their own recipe for boiling eggs. We usually boil them for about 10 minutes and then leave them in the warm water with the pot’s lid on for about 10 more minutes. We always check an egg afterwards just to make sure they’re cooked to our preferences.

In case you love deviled eggs (like Emma does), you’re going to love deviled duck eggs even more! The natural creaminess of the eggs makes all the difference when you devil them! This is Emma’s mom’s recipe for curried, devil duck eggs… The BEST deviled eggs around!

Baking with Duck Eggs

Duck eggs are often touted as being the very best for baking, and it’s totally true! Since we only eat duck eggs these days (no chicken eggs for us), we’ve baked with duck eggs for a long time. The creaminess of duck eggs makes baking with them simply amazing! When you’re baking, you can substitute duck eggs for chicken eggs 1:1.

Duck Egg Drop Soup

This is perhaps the easiest and most unique way to enjoy duck eggs. We make a delicious broth with our chicken bones and make sure that the strained and ready-to-drink broth is very lightly simmering. Then we crack a few duck eggs into a bowl and whisk them so that when we slowly pour them into the simmering broth, they are easily stirred into small pieces with a fast-moving whisk. The whisked duck eggs cook in a matter of minutes and then we like to add peas and other yummy spices! Try this simple and easy recipe for a delicous treat.

Duck Egg Drop Soup!

Duck Egg Drop Soup!

There is always a way to enjoy nutritious and yummy duck eggs!

 

 

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Farm Food Friday: Gluten, Flour, & Sugar Free Breakfast Pancakes

I usually skip the simpler carbohydrates if I can, like rice and flour, but that doesn’t make me any less hungry…

After some trial and error, Jason created a fantastic and simple pancake recipe, loaded with calories but low in sugar! What a great and filling breakfast! Plus, it’s fantastic with one of my very favorite foods: grass fed butter.

It’s so simple, you’ll be surprised! You can make these into classic pancakes, or you can take the easy route and bake the batter in the oven as a thicker cake. I enjoy the texture of the baked pancakes better.

Ingredients:

  • 6 medium/large sweet potatoes
  • 12 duck eggs (or chicken eggs, if you prefer)
  • 1 banana (a browner one is preferable)
  • Powdered ginger
  • Powdered cinnamon
  • Salt

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Materials:

  • Large mixing bowl
  • Potato masher
  • Whisk
  • Mixing spoon
  • 8×11″ oven pan

Directions:

  • Wash sweet potatoes
  • Bake whole sweet potatoes in the oven on 350 until soft
  • Once cool, peel sweet potatoes and place in the large mixing bowl
  • Peel banana and place with potatoes
  • Mash potatoes and banana until moderately smooth
  • Add 1/3 of eggs and mash/stir together until mixed evenly. Add second and third 1/3 of eggs when previous eggs are mixed in properly and do the same
  • Add a pinch of salt and ginger
  • Add a pinch (or more, if desired) of cinnamon
  • Mix thoroughly with whisk, spoon, and masher, attempting to make the mixture as smooth as possible.
  • Preheat oven to 350
  • Grease 8×11″ pan and pour in mixture
  • Smooth the top of the mixture
  • Bake on 350 for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until a knife can be removed cleanly from cake
  • Enjoy!

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How to Cook Your Heritage Thanksgiving Turkey

Now that you’ve purchased your free range, non-GMO Heritage Thanksgiving Turkey, you’re probably wondering how to cook it! You may have noticed that your heritage bird looks very different than the average grocery store turkey. You are right to think that there is a different technique needed in cooking your heritage bird, but never fear! We have some recipe resources for you and your family to try this holiday season.

Heritage birds are smaller than an average grocery store turkey and they tend to cook more quickly. They have more dark meat, which is great for roasting the whole bird because it is less likely to dry out.

Heritage turkeys also taste different than your average Butterball turkey. They aren’t bland and actually taste like turkey. That’s because, well, they are turkeys. Heritage birds are closer to their wild ancestors and spend their free ranging days running around the land, building muscle for your Thanksgiving enjoyment. The flavor of the meat tends to pair well with earthy, aromatic spices like sage, rosemary, and thyme. This means you can get creative with recipes this holiday season!

turkey

A delicious, roasted turkey!

Here are a few recipes that your family might enjoy this Thanksgiving:

Here are a few of our tips for cooking your Heritage Turkey:

  • Make sure your bird is fully thawed before you cook it.
  • Take it out of the refrigerator and let it come up to room temperature for 30 minutes to an hour before you begin cooking it.
  • Don’t overcook your bird!
  • These birds have not been injected with whatever gross flavor concoction the conventional grocery store birds have been, so be sure to season appropriately (salt, pepper, garlic, whatever floats your gravy boat).
  • The USDA recommends cooking your bird until the internal temperature (the meat in the inner thigh) reaches 165 degrees. However, many chefs recommend cooking your Heritage Turkey until it reaches 140-150 degrees.
  • When you take your bird out of the oven, let it rest for at least 15-20 minutes before you carve it. This allows for all of the moisture and juices to seep back into the meat instead of being released as steam.
  • Don’t cook the stuffing inside the bird. Because heritage birds cook quicker, the stuffing might make the bird cook unevenly. You can still add aromatics like part of an onion, apple, or carrot to the cavity to add moisture and flavor.
  • If you are cooking it at a higher temperature, you might want to skip basting the bird. This is because constantly opening the oven door lowers the temperature and might make the bird cook unevenly.
  • Heritage Turkeys do not need to be brined (they have their own delicious flavor). Some chefs say that brining enhances the flavor and others say that it is unnecessary and simply extra work.
  • Don’t forget to save your bones! Simmer them in a crock pot with water for hours to make a stock or broth. These birds were raised naturally on pasture and their bones, tendons, and joints will make a delicious and nutritious broth!

For more information and tips about cooking your Heritage Turkey, check out these articles from Rodale’s Organic Life about How to Cook the Tastiest Bird Ever This Thanksgiving and The Magic of Fire: Traditional Foodways by William Rubel.

We wish you a Happy Thanksgiving, from our Family Homestead to your Family Table! If you are interested in sharing your Heritage Turkey recipes or pictures from this year’s Thanksgiving, send us an email at ourochreway@gmail.com so we can add it to our website!

Also, it’s not too early too early or too late to reserve your free range, non-GMO Heritage Thanksgiving Turkey for Thanksgiving 2016. Check out our Heritage Turkeys page for more information!

turkeys

Happy turkeys!

Pekin Duck Recipe 4: Lower Heat, Longer Time

We’ve been experimenting with Pekin duck recipes over the last few weeks, learning about the best ways to cook our new favorite meal! We want to offer you some of our thoughts about our simple recipes, in case you are new to cooking duck and wonder how it should be done. So far we’ve cooked 4 ducks in 4 different ways, and we do have our favorite techniques! The exciting thing that we’ve learned from all this cooking, is that it’s really hard to ruin duck, short of burning it. There is so much fat that the meat never dries out the way chicken or turkey does when overcooked. Knowing this should help quell your fear about cooking duck… Just go for it!

Here is the fourth recipe we tried!

Lower Heat, Longer Time (and a Pan Seared Breast): 250 degrees for 3 hours, 350 for 45 minutes, and a quick broil

First, cut out the breast! When you remove the breast before you cook the meat for any length of time, it allows you to choose your desired meat temperature/color when you cook it. This is our favorite way of dealing with the bird, since the skin gets all crispy in the pan! Yummy!

Then, score the skin on both sides so that the fat will cook out of the bird and pool in the bottom of the dish. This allows the meat to stay moist but the skin to get crispy!

Cover the duck liberally with salt and garlic powder.

Place the duck, breast down, in a dish and cook for 3 hours at 250 degrees. Then continue cooking the duck at 350 degrees for 45 minutes longer. If you desire even crispier skin, finish off the bird in the oven for a few minutes on broil.

At any point in time, cook the breast in a skillet on the stove. Cook it on medium heat, skin side down so the skin becomes crispy and the fat runs out into the pan! Cook it to the desired color (we think pink is the best)!

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Taste Test:

The breast was moist and delicious, with crispy skin! It tasted like a tender cut of beef and was very pink and juicy. This was our favorite breast, since we didn’t cook it in the oven before pan searing it!

The legs were moist and falling off of the bone! These were our favorite thighs to date. Also, the rest of the bird stayed moist and didn’t dry out even though it was cooked for almost 4 hours!!

The skin was super crispy, Jason’s favorite!

Yum!

Through all of this taste testing, we learned that duck can withstand a lot of weirdness and still be great! So don’t be afraid to try out your own recipes. And if you do… Let us know about them here!

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Pekin Duck Recipe 3: Medium Heat, Pan-Seared Breast

We’ve been experimenting with Pekin duck recipes over the last few weeks, learning about the best ways to cook our new favorite meal! We want to offer you some of our thoughts about our simple recipes, in case you are new to cooking duck and wonder how it should be done. So far we’ve cooked 4 ducks in 4 different ways, and we do have our favorite techniques! The exciting thing that we’ve learned from all this cooking, is that it’s really hard to ruin duck, short of burning it. There is so much fat that the meat never dries out the way chicken or turkey does when overcooked. Knowing this should help quell your fear about cooking duck… Just go for it!

Here is the third recipe we tried!

Medium Heat, Pan-Seared Breast: 325 degrees for 1.75 hours

Score the skin on both sides so that the fat will cook out of the bird and pool in the bottom of the dish. This allows the meat to stay moist but the skin to get crispy! Do not score the skin over the breast!

Cover the duck liberally with salt and garlic powder.

Place the duck in a dish and cook for 1 hour. At the end of the hour, remove duck from oven and cut out the breast. Return the rest of the bird to the oven and continue cooking 45 minutes longer. Be sure to flip the bird a few times during the total cooking period.

Now, finish off the breast in a skillet on the stove. Cook it on medium heat, skin side down so the skin becomes crispy and the fat runs out into the pan! Cook it to the desired color (pink is the best)!

duck breast

Pan-seared duck breast!

Taste Test:

The breast was moist and delicious, with crispy skin! It tasted like a tender cut of beef, and was best served pink. Our second favorite breast, since we thought that we could have cut it out of the bird earlier, around 30 minutes…. Then pan-seared it.

The legs were moist and very good, but not our favorite thighs to date. In fact, the entire bird remained moist (just like with the second recipe)!

The skin was crispy–perfect for me! Jason thought that we could have cooked the bird maybe 30 minutes longer for even crispier skin.

Stay tuned for the fourth recipe we tried!

 

 

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Pekin Duck Recipe 2: Medium Heat, Roasted Breast

We’ve been experimenting with Pekin duck recipes over the last few weeks, learning about the best ways to cook our new favorite meal!We want to offer you some of our thoughts about our simple recipes, in case you are new to cooking duck and wonder how it should be done. So far we’ve cooked 4 ducks in 4 different ways, and we do have our favorite techniques! The exciting thing that we’ve learned from all this cooking, is that it’s really hard to ruin duck, short of burning it. There is so much fat that the meat never dries out the way chicken or turkey does when overcooked. Knowing this should help quell your fear about cooking duck… Just go for it!

Here is the second recipe we tried!

Medium Heat, Roasted Breast: 325 degrees for 2.5 hours with veggies

Score the skin on both sides so that the fat will cook out of the bird and pool in the bottom of the dish. This allows the meat to stay moist but the skin to get crispy!

Cover the duck liberally with salt and garlic powder.

Place the duck, breast up, in a dish filled with your favorite veggies (we used carrots, celery, and onion). The great thing about this is that the veggies will soak up the duck fat and become the most delicious veggies you’ve ever tasted! Add as many veggies as you’d like… There is plenty of duck fat to go around!

duck

The finished product!

Taste Test:

The breast was moist and delicious, but it wasn’t our favorite technique to date!

The legs were a moist and very good, but not our favorite thighs to date.

The skin on the top of the bird was crispy, and my favorite skin overall! But, since the bird was not flipped during the cooking time, the skin adjacent to the veggies was not crispy!

Stay tuned for the third recipe we tried!

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Pekin Duck Recipe 1: High Heat, Low Time

We’ve been experimenting with Pekin duck recipes over the last few weeks, learning about the best ways to cook our new favorite meal!We want to offer you some of our thoughts about our simple recipes, in case you are new to cooking duck and wonder how it should be done. So far we’ve cooked 4 ducks in 4 different ways, and we do have our favorite techniques! The exciting thing that we’ve learned from all this cooking, is that it’s really hard to ruin duck, short of burning it. There is so much fat that the meat never dries out the way chicken or turkey does when overcooked. Knowing this should help quell your fear about cooking duck… Just go for it!

Here is the first recipe we tried!

High Heat, Low Time: 425 degrees for 2 hours

Score the skin on both sides so that the fat will cook out of the bird and pool in the bottom of the dish. This allows the meat to stay moist but the skin to get crispy!

Cover the duck liberally with salt and garlic powder.

Flip the bird 2 or 3 times during the cooking time, spaced evenly throughout the 2 hour time period.

Cut the breast out of the bird after 1 hour and 15 minutes and continue cooking the rest of the meat for another 45 minutes.

ducks

Ducks going in the oven!

Taste Test:

The breast was overcooked and a little dry. We learned that we should have cut it out much sooner!

The legs were a perfect moistness.

The skin was partially crispy, which was great for me but Jason would have preferred it crispier!

Stay tuned for the second recipe we tried!

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Duck Feet Soup: Medicine in Broth

Jason injured his hand about 3 weeks ago and he had surgery 2 weeks ago. He cut himself butchering a pig and sliced through the nerve, artery, and nicked the tendon sheath of his right hand’s pointer finger.

It’s been a slow road to recovery… He hasn’t been able to move around much because of the pain/discomfort and it’s always hard to do very much for yourself with only one hand in operation.

So… We’ve been looking for ways for him to heal faster. Your diet, of course, is really the most important component of healing!

And what better meal to eat than a meal made of the very organic materials that are healing? Tendons, muscles, and nerves!

duck feet

24 duck feet waiting in the pot!

So we made the most delicious duck foot soup! We had 24 feet from our duck butchery a few months ago. We made it Vietnamese style, with spicy peppers, soy sauce, carrots, garlic, onions, celery, and tons of shiitake mushrooms! Shiitake mushrooms have numerous health benefits: they fight “bad” bacteria, viruses, and contain tons of B vitamins and many other micronutrients that are essential to life and healing. To this soup we added rice noodles and fresh cilantro and basil.

It was perhaps the most delicious meal we’ve had in months… And it’s gone now. We ate it for lunch and dinner every day until there was no more!

The feet of birds are often very fatty (unprocessed animal fat from healthy, organic animals is good for you!!!) and filled with awesome gelatin and nutrients! We moaned in enjoyment while we ate!

soup

Yummy soup!

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Let’s see how he heals now!!!

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Farm Food Friday: Venison Meatballs

We’ve gotten a little tired of the same old venison dishes, so we decided to make some venison meatballs!

We pulled out the old meat grinder, and after cutting the venison into smaller chunks, we started grinding away.

We added some duck fat that we saved from our last roast duck, since venison is not very fatty and we didn’t want to meatballs to be too dry!

This is what our ground venison looked like after we were done:

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Then we added some of our sage:

sage

And our garlic:

garlic

And a couple of our eggs and some bread crumbs for texture.

Then we cooked them up in a little olive oil:

meatballs

We cooked up a rue (after the removing the meatballs from the pan) using the oils and fats from the pan, coconut milk, flour, and olive oil. We added some more garlic, salt, and pepper and once the rue was almost finished we added the meatballs back in to let the flavors meld.

We served it over rice and then promptly inhaled it:

meatballs and rice

 

Yummy!

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Farm Food Friday: Rooster, Potato, and Tomato Soup!

The great thing about this soup, is that we raised almost all of the the ingredients!

Let me start by saying that the photographs do not do it justice… And you are going to need either a huge pot or two pots!

Ingredients:

  • Bones and the partial meat of 3 teenage roosters
  • Lots of sweet potatoes
  • Lots of Irish potatoes
  • About 25 garlic cloves
  • 2 quarts of cubed tomatoes
  • 2 Large onions
  • Celery
  • 1 pint of corn
  • Basil, parsley, oregano, garlic powder, jalapeños

Directions:

The first thing we did was butcher our roosters, and since that would take forever to explain, we’ll save that story for another time. We roasted and ate some of the roosters and left part of the meat on the bones for our soup.

We cooked the roosters in a large pot with water and a little salt to make the broth. We included all of the bones, even the feet (which had already been peeled). The next day is when we had planned to start the soup, and when we removed the pot from the fridge to de-bone the meat, we found that the entire concoction was gelatinous! Talk about good, healthy, fat! Even though these roosters were not fully matured and they are not a breed that is bred just for their meat, they had so much delicious fat on them!

soup

Yummy, fatty, chicken!

 

broth

Best broth ever!

I de-boned the meat and placed the bones in the crockpot so we could cook these down further and make bone broth.

Then we sauteed diced onions, the garlic cloves, and celery in some of the fat. The onions and the garlics were from my dad’s garden!

The rest of the fat/meat/broth jelly was added to the pot and it started to melt and become true broth again. We added some of our diced and frozen basil, parsley, and jalapeño from the garden and let this melt and mix together.

Next in was  the corn.

potatoes

A lovely potato medley!

Then we added the potatoes (all from our garden) and once the soup was up to temperature again, we added the tomatoes. The tomato mix we used was a frozen bunch of cubed Cherokee Purples, San Marzanos, and Black Plums.

Then we added more basil, some oregano,salt, and garlic powder and continued to let it cook until the potatoes proved to be done!

soup

The finished product!

And then we ate it! Last night for dinner and today for lunch and tonight for dinner… This soups is one of our favorites so far!

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